Rabie Yassin

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Rabie Yassin

Personal information

Full name
Mohamed Rabie Yassin

Date of birth
(1960-09-07) 7 September 1960 (age 56)

Place of birth
Beni Suef, Egypt

Height
1.73 m (5 ft 8 in)

Playing position
Left-back

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

Al Ahly SC
310
(16)

National team

Egypt

(7)

Teams managed

Egypt (under-20)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

Mohamed Rabie Yassin (Arabic: ربيع ياسين) (born 7 September 1960 in Beni Suef) is a former Egyptian footballer and current football manager.
As a left back, he played and captained Al Ahly SC as well as playing and captaining the Egypt national team. He participated in the 1990 FIFA World Cup and the 1984 Summer Olympics.[1]
In 2013, as manager of the Egypt national under-20 football team, he won the 2013 African U-20 Championship, and competed in the 2013 FIFA U-20 World Cup.
References[edit]

^ “Mohamed Rabi Yassine Biography and Statistics”. Sports Reference. Retrieved 2009-07-25. 

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Egypt squad – 1984 Summer Olympics

1 El-Maamour
2 Gadallah
3 Yassin
4 Saleh
5 Youssef
6 Sedki
7 Abdou
8 Gharieb
9 Abdleghani
10 El Khatib
11 Soliman
12 Abou Zeid
13 El Badr
14 Hassan
15 Omer
16 Nabiel
17 Salem
Coach: Mawser

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Egypt squad – 1990 FIFA World Cup

1 Shobair
2 I. Hassan
3 Yassin
4 H. Ramzy
5 Yakan
6 Kasem
7 Ismail
8 Abdelghani
9 H. Hassan
10 Abdel-Hameed (c)
11 Soliman
12 Abou Zeid
13 A. Ramzy
14 Mayhoub
15 Saber
16 Tolba
17 Shawky
18 Orabi
19 Abdelrahman
20 El-Kass
21 Taher
22 El-Batal
Coach: El-Gohary

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Egypt squad – 1992 African Cup of Nations

GK El-Saghir
GK Moustafa
GK Shobair
DF Fawzi
DF I. Hassan
DF Ragab
DF A. Ramzy
DF H. Ramzy
DF Yakan
DF Yassin
MF Abdelghani
MF Azima
MF El-Kass
MF Kasem
MF Solim
분당오피

Brenda Putnam

Brenda Putnam with her Bust of Jean.[1]

Brenda Putnam (June 3, 1890, Minneapolis, Minnesota – October 18, 1975, Concord, New Hampshire) was a noted American sculptor, teacher and author.

Contents

1 Biography

1.1 Early works
1.2 A more modern aesthetic
1.3 Awards and honors
1.4 Teacher and author
1.5 Death and legacy

2 Selected works

2.1 Sculptures
2.2 Cemetery monuments
2.3 Busts and statuettes
2.4 Medals and coins

3 References
4 External links

Biography[edit]
She was the daughter of Librarian of Congress Herbert Putnam and his wife Charlotte Elizabeth Munroe. Her older sister Shirley and she were granddaughters of publisher George Palmer Putnam.[2] She attended the National Cathedral School in Washington, D.C., where she first was taught to sculpt.[3] She also trained as a classical pianist, and toured with violinist Edith Rubel and cellist Marie Roemaet as the Edith Rubel Trio.[4][5]
She studied at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1905-07, under Mary E. Moore, William McGregor Paxton and Bela Pratt; then for three years at the Art Students League of New York under James Earle Fraser.[6] She also studied at the Corcoran Museum Art School in Washington, D.C.[6]
Early works[edit]
Early in her career, Putnam was noted for her busts of children and for garden and fountain figures.[6] She exhibited an overtly sensual piece at the National Academy of Design in 1915, Charmides [Dialogue], a nude woman and man asleep together, which was described as “Rodin-like.”[7] To mark the grave of her close friend, pianist Anne Simon, she created a profound work: the Simon Memorial (1917)[8]— a nude male angel ecstatically rising from the clouds.[9]

“Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, is a supremely beautiful spot wherein are erected many striking memorials. Within recent years there has grown to be another place of pilgrimage—the memorial to Mrs. Otto Torney Simon. The triumph of her passing from “life to life” … is symbolized in the Simon Memorial wrought by Brenda Putnam. Until recently, I had never heard of this winged figure interpreted by one who knows the full significance of the statue. [T]his angel with wide flung hands and upward gaze symbolizes liberation of our faculties and our abilities, the enfranchisement of the soul released by the kindly gift of Death.”[10]

She modeled a series of busts of musicians, including Metropolitan Opera conductor Artur Bodanzky,[11] Russian pianist Ossip Gabrilowitsch,[12] British pianist

2001 French rugby league tour of New Zealand and Papua New Guinea

The 2001 French rugby league tour of New Zealand and Papua New Guinea was a tour by the France national rugby league team.

Contents

1 Background
2 Squad
3 Fixtures
4 References

Background[edit]
The French arrived in the Southern Hemisphere having put in mediocre performance in the 2000 World Cup. The side finished with a 2 win, 2 loss record – the two losses being to Papua New Guinea (20-23) and New Zealand (6-54 in the quarterfinals).
Squad[edit]
The French squad included Eric Anselme (St Gaudens), Frederic Banquet (Villeneueve), Patrice Benausse (Carcassonne), David Berthezene (UTC), Laurent Carrasco (Villeneueve), Jean-Emmanuel Cassin (Toulouse), Gilles Cornut, Fabien Devecchi (c – Avignon), Yaccine Dekkiche (Avignon), Arnaud Dulac (St Gaudens), Laurent Frayssinous (Villeneueve), Romain Gagilazzo (Villeneueve), Renaud Guigue (Avignon), Rachid Hechiche (Lyon), Sylvain Houles (UTC), Pascal Jampy (UTC), Patrick Noguerra (Pia), Nicholas Piccolo (Limoux), Artie Shead (Villeneueve), Romain Sort (Villeneueve), Gael Tallec (UTC), Michael Van Snick, Jerome Vincent (Toulouse), Frédéric Teixido (Limoux), Jean-Christophe Borlin (St Gaudens) and Vincent Wulf (Villeneueve).[1]
They were coached by Gilles Dumas.
Fixtures[edit]
The test match against New Zealand was celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the first test match held between the two nations in New Zealand, held during the 1951 French tour of New Zealand.
The French team also played three matches against regional selections; Northern Districts, Central Districts and the South Island.[2] France won all three of these games, defeating the South Island 24-11 at Lancaster Park,[3][4] Central Districts 28-26 at the Palmerston North Showgrounds and Northern Districts 40-16 in Huntly. Jeff Whittaker coached the South Island team that featured mainly Canterbury Bulls players.[5] The team was captained by Shane Beyers and included Aaron Whittaker.[6] Northern Districts included Lance Hohaia and Hare Te Rangi.[7][8]

Date
Opponent
Venue
Result
Score
Attendance
Report

2 June
South Island
Lancaster Park, Christchurch
Won
24-18

[1]

6 June
Central Districts
Palmerston North Showgrounds, Palmerston North
Won
28-26

[2]

10 June
 New Zealand
Ericsson Stadium, Auckland
Loss
0-36
4,500
[3]

13 June
Northern Districts
Davis Park, Huntly
Won
40-16

[4]

17 June
 Papua New Guinea
Lloyd Robson Oval, Port Moresby
Won
27-16
15,000
[5]

20 June
 Papua New Guinea
Danny Leahy Oval, Goroka
Loss
24-34

강남오피

Patricia Kitcher

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Patricia Kitcher

Residence
New York, New York, United States

Nationality
United States

Fields
Kant Philosophy of psychology

Institutions
Columbia University

Alma mater
Wellesley College (B.A.); Princeton University (Ph.D.)

Patricia Kitcher (born in 1948) is the Roberta and William Campbell Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University,[1] widely known for her work on Immanuel Kant and on philosophy of psychology.

Contents

1 Biography
2 Career
3 Selected bibliography
4 References
5 External links

Biography[edit]
Born Patricia Williams, she attended Wellesley College and then graduate school in philosophy at Princeton where she studied with George Pitcher. Kitcher has held faculty positions at the University of Vermont, the University of Minnesota, and University of California, San Diego, and a visiting position at University of Michigan. In 1998 she went to Columbia University where she became the Mark van Doren Professor of the Humanities and chair of the philosophy department. She lives in New York City with her husband, Philip Kitcher, also a philosopher, with whom she has two sons, Andrew and Charles.
Career[edit]
Kitcher’s interest in cognition manifested early and has continued to shape and inform her work throughout her career. Her doctoral dissertation defended a psychological continuity criterion for personal identity but extended the scope of the psychological criterion beyond that traditionally posited to include broader and more abstract cognitive characteristics, such as cognitive approach or cognitive style. Since then her work has ranged widely from traditional philosophy of psychology, to Sigmund Freud, and ultimately to her greatest philosophical passion: Kant scholarship.
In her early work Kitcher wrote a number of papers in philosophy of psychology, philosophy of mind, and philosophy of science. She argued for the viability of intentional psychology and the autonomy of functionalist psychology from neurophysiology. Later work predominantly concentrated on analysis of problems stemming from the interpretation of Kant’s first Critique. Kitcher has written numerous articles on the forms of intuition, Kant’s epistemology, self-conscio
분당오피

Takeshiba Station

Takeshiba Station
竹芝駅

Location
Minato, Tokyo
Japan

Operated by
Tokyo Waterfront New Transit Corporation

Line(s)
Yurikamome

Connections

Bus stop

Other information

Station code
U-03

History

Opened
1995

Takeshiba Station (竹芝駅, Takeshiba-eki?) is a station on the Yurikamome Line in Minato, Tokyo, Japan, operated by Tokyo Waterfront New Transit Corporation. It is numbered “U-03”.

Contents

1 Station layout

1.1 Platforms

2 Adjacent stations
3 History
4 See also
5 References
6 External links

Station layout[edit]
The station has two elevated side platforms. This is the only station of the line that has two side platforms,[1] as all the others stations have one (or two) island platforms.
Platforms[edit]

1
■ Yurikamome
for Daiba, Aomi, Ariake, and Toyosu

2
■ Yurikamome
for Shimbashi

Adjacent stations[edit]

«
Service
»

Yurikamome

Shiodome

Hinode

History[edit]
The station opened on 1 November 1995.[2]
See also[edit]

List of railway stations in Japan

References[edit]

^ http://www.yurikamome.tokyo/route_guidance/u-03/
^ Terada, Hirokazu (19 January 2013). データブック日本の私鉄 [Databook: Japan’s Private Railways]. Japan: Neko Publishing. p. 220. ISBN 978-4-7770-1336-4. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Takeshiba Station.

Official information site

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New Transit Yurikamome

Shimbashi
Shiodome
Takeshiba
Hinode
Shibaura-futō
Odaiba-kaihinkōen
Daiba
Fune-no-kagakukan
Telecom Center
Aomi
Kokusai-tenjijō-seimon
Ariake
Ariake-tennis-no-mori
Shijō-mae
Shin-Toyosu
Toyosu

Coordinates: 35°39′14″N 139°45′43″E / 35.6540°N 139.7619°E / 35.6540; 139.7619

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