Soninho River

Soninho River

Other name(s)
Rio Soninho

Country
Brazil

Basin features

Main source
Mateiros, Tocantins
10°13′40″S 46°36′31″W / 10.227830°S 46.608604°W / -10.227830; -46.608604

River mouth
Do Sono River
10°10′55″S 46°56′08″W / 10.181875°S 46.935478°W / -10.181875; -46.935478Coordinates: 10°10′55″S 46°56′08″W / 10.181875°S 46.935478°W / -10.181875; -46.935478

River system
Do Sono River

The Soninho River (Portuguese: Rio Soninho) is a river of Tocantins state, Brazil. It is a headwater of the Do Sono River.
The Soninho river forms on the northeast boundary of the 158,885 hectares (392,610 acres) Jalapão State Park, a fully protected conservation unit created in 2001.[1] It runs west along the north boundary of the park to the point where it meets the Novo River from the right to form the Do Sono River.
See also[edit]

List of rivers of Tocantins

References[edit]

^ PES do Jalapão (in Portuguese), ISA: Instituto Socioambiental, retrieved 2016-06-11 

This article related to a river in Tocantins, Brazil is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

부천오피

Cold War (song)

“Cold War”

Single by Janelle Monáe

from the album The ArchAndroid

Released
February 12, 2010

Format
Digital download

Genre

Rock
new wave
Afro-funk

Length
3:23

Label

Wondaland Arts Society
Bad Boy

Writer(s)

Nathaniel Irvin III
Charles Joseph II
Janelle Monáe Robinson

Producer(s)

Nate Wonder
Chuck Lightning
Janelle Monáe

Janelle Monáe singles chronology

“Tightrope”
(2010)
“Cold War”
(2010)
“We Are Young”
(2011)

“Cold War” is a song recorded by American singer-songwriter Janelle Monáe for her debut studio album The ArchAndroid (2010). The song was written and produced by Monáe, Nathaniel Irvin III, and Charles Joseph II. It was released on February 12, 2010 on Monáe’s website, one day after the release of The ArchAndroid’s first single, “Tightrope”. “Cold War” was produced as a fast paced rock, new wave and Afro-funk track with a futuristic feel. Its drum pattern has received several comparison to that of OutKast’s 2000 single “B.O.B. (Bombs Over Baghdad)”. Music critics acclaimed the song as one of the best tracks from The ArchAndroid. The accompanying music video was directed and shot by Wendy Morgan at a sanitarium. It features Monáe emoting throughout the video and has been praised by critics as a unique piece of work.

Contents

1 Development
2 Music and lyrics
3 Release and reception
4 Music video
5 Remix
6 Live performances
7 Credits and personnel
8 Chart history
9 References

Development[edit]
“Cold War” was co-written and co-produced by Robinson with Nathaniel Irvin III and Charles Joseph II, credited under their production names Janelle Monáe, Nate Wonder, and Chuck Lightning.[1] The song was recorded by Control Z and Roman GianArthur at Wonderland Studios in Atlanta, Georgia; it was mastered by Larry Anthony at CO5 Mastering, also in Atlanta.[1] Irvin and Phil Tan edited “Cold War” at Wonderland Studios and Soapbox Studios, respectively.[1] Robinson enlisted several musicians to create the song’s overall sound.[1] Irvin provided most of the instrumentation for the song, including the Mellotron, electric guitar, organs, and percussion.[1] Backing vocals for the song were recorded by Robinson and Irvin.[1] Robinson enlisted the Wonderland Orchestra to play the revolutionary strings. Kellindo Parker performs on guitar, lead guitar, guitar (rhythm), and soloist.[1] Grace Shim performed on the cello while Alexander Page provided the violin and viola; Irvin head the string arra
강남오피

Ashley Range

Ashley Range

Located Near Southampton, Hampshire, England

Ashley Range

Ashley Range, shown within Hampshire

Coordinates
50°56′23″N 1°42′33″W / 50.939761°N 1.709057°W / 50.939761; -1.709057

Type
Bombing Range

Site history

Built
1942

In use
1942-1946

Ashley Range is a former World War II bombing range in the New Forest, Hampshire, England. It is located approximately 5 miles (8.0 km) northwest of Lyndhurst and 14 miles (23 km) west of Southampton.
It was used as a testing range for the Barnes Wallis’s Grand Slam bomb and also the Bouncing bomb used by the Dambusters.
Overview[edit]
The site was used to developed a more effective air-raid shelter, built over five and a half months at a cost of £250,000. Once complete, the site became the first anywhere in the world to be subjected to the devastating effect of Barnes Wallis’s Grand Slam bomb, which was test-dropped on the site. After the end of the war, the site was returned to its natural state, and the concrete bunker was encased in a mound of dirt because it could not be demolished. Visitors today can still see the bomb craters, an observation shelter and chalk markings made on the ground in order to help bombers find their targets.[1][2]
References[edit]

^ “Ashly Range”. New Forest National Park. Retrieved 23 January 2014. 
^ Hugo Gye (23 January 2014). “Revealed: The birthplace of Barnes Wallis’s other top secret weapon”. Daily Mail. Retrieved 23 January 2014. 

분당오피

Rosetta Cattaneo

Rosetta Cattaneo

Personal information

Nationality
Italian

Born
(1919-01-14)January 14, 1919
Greco, Italy

Died
1988 (aged 69)

Sport

Country
Italy

Sport
Athletics

Event(s)
Sprint

Club
La Filotecnica Milano

Achievements and titles

Personal best(s)

200 m 25.3 (1940)

Medal record

European Championships

1938 Vienna
4×100 m relay

Rosetta Cattaneo (14 January 1919 – 1988) was an Italian sprinter. She was the italian record holder for women in the 200 metres with the time of 25.3 established in 1940.

Contents

1 Biography
2 Achievements
3 National championships
4 See also
5 References
6 External links

Biography[edit]
She won a bronze medal in the 4×100 metres relay, the first medal ever for Italian women in a relay race, at the 1938 European Athletics Championships in Vienna, with co-runners Maria Apollonio, Maria Alfero and Italia Lucchini[1] She has 8 caps in national team from 1937 to 1942.[2]
Achievements[edit]

Year
Competition
Venue
Position
Event
Performance
Notes

1938
European Championships
Vienna
3rd
4×100 m relay
50.4
[3]

National championships[edit]
Rosetta Cattaneo has won the individual national championship four times.[4]

4 wins in the 200 metres (1939, 1940, 1942, 1943)

See also[edit]

Italy national relay team

References[edit]

^ “Staffetta 4×100 Metri Donne” (in Italian). albi-giochi.com. Retrieved 13 December 2012. 
^ Annuario dell’Atletica 2009. FIDAL. 2009. 
^ “2nd European Athletics Championships, 1938”. athleticsdb.com. Retrieved 12 December 2012. 
^ “”CAMPIONATI “ASSOLUTI” ITALIANE SUL PODIO TRICOLORE – 1923 2012″ (PDF). sportolimpico.it. Retrieved 12 December 2012. 

External links[edit]

(Italian) Dizionario biografico delle donne lombarde: 568-1968 – Rosetta Cattaneo

v
t
e

Italian Athletics Champions in women’s 200 m

1930: Maria Bravin
1931: Nives De Grassi
1932: Maria Coselli
1933: Claudia Testoni
1934: Claudia Testoni
1935: Livia Michiels
1936: Gina Varetto
1937: Fernanda Bullano
1938: Ita Penzo
1939: Rosetta Cattaneo
1940: Rosetta Cattaneo
1941: Ester Meneghello
1942: Rosetta Cattaneo
1943: Rosetta Cattaneo
1944-1945: not held
1946: Anna Maria Cantù
1947: Anna Maria Cantù
1948: Mirella Avalle
1949: Marisa Rossi
1950: Laura Sivi
1951: Vittoria Cesarini
1952: Giuseppina Leone
1953: Giuseppina Leone
1954: Giuseppina Leone
1955: Giuseppina Leone
1956: Giuseppina Leone
1957: Giuseppina Leone
1958: Giuseppina Leone
1959: Giuseppina Leo
부산오피

Kaamanen

Kaamanen is a village in the municipality of Inari, Lapland.
The village counts about 200 inhabitants, whose main sources of livelihood are reindeer husbandry and tourism. The area is extremely valuable for bird-watchers and there are relatively important hiking paths.[1]
Languages[edit]
The municipality has four official languages: Finnish, Inari Sami (ca. 400 estimated speakers), Skolt Sami (ca. 400 speakers), and Northern Sami (ca. 700 speakers). The estimates of how many people have some command of each of the Sami languages differ from the number of people who list them as their mother tongues. Of the total population of 6,863 in 2010, 6,366 people registered Finnish as their mother tongue and 400 one of the Sami languages. 97 inhabitants were native speakers of other languages.
References[edit]

^ “Monikulttuurinen Inari” (in Finnish). 

External links[edit]
Media related to Kaamanen at Wikimedia Commons
Coordinates: 69°06′11″N 27°11′46″E / 69.103°N 27.196°E / 69.103; 27.196

This Lapland (Finland) location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

부산오피

Montfort-le-Gesnois

Montfort-le-Gesnois

Montfort-le-Gesnois

Location within Pays de la Loire region 

Montfort-le-Gesnois

Coordinates: 48°02′57″N 0°24′16″E / 48.0492°N 0.4044°E / 48.0492; 0.4044Coordinates: 48°02′57″N 0°24′16″E / 48.0492°N 0.4044°E / 48.0492; 0.4044

Country
France

Region
Pays de la Loire

Department
Sarthe

Arrondissement
Mamers

Canton
Montfort-le-Gesnois (chef-lieu)

Intercommunality
Communauté de communes du Pays des Brières et du Gesnois

Government

 • Mayor (2008–2014)
Paul Glinche

Area1
18.74 km2 (7.24 sq mi)

Population (2006[1])2
3,050

 • Density
160/km2 (420/sq mi)

Time zone
CET (UTC+1)

 • Summer (DST)
CEST (UTC+2)

INSEE/Postal code
72241 / 72450

Elevation
54–113 m (177–371 ft)

Website
www.montfort-le-gesnois.fr

1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries.
2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Montfort-le-Gesnois is a commune in the Sarthe department in the region of Pays-de-la-Loire in north-western France.
See also[edit]

Communes of the Sarthe department

References[edit]

INSEE

^ populations légales 2006 sur le site de l’INSEE

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Montfort-le-Gesnois.

v
t
e

Communes of the Sarthe department

Aigné
Aillières-Beauvoir
Allonnes
Amné
Ancinnes
Arçonnay
Ardenay-sur-Mérize
Arnage
Arthezé
Asnières-sur-Vègre
Assé-le-Boisne
Assé-le-Riboul
Aubigné-Racan
Les Aulneaux
Auvers-le-Hamon
Auvers-sous-Montfaucon
Avesnes-en-Saosnois
Avessé
Avezé
Avoise
Le Bailleul
Ballon-Saint-Mars
La Bazoge
Bazouges-sur-le-Loir
Beaufay
Beaumont-Pied-de-Bœuf
Beaumont-sur-Dême
Beaumont-sur-Sarthe
Beillé
Berfay
Bernay
Bérus
Bessé-sur-Braye
Béthon
Blèves
Boëssé-le-Sec
Bonnétable
La Bosse
Bouër
Bouloire
Bourg-le-Roi
Bousse
Brains-sur-Gée
Le Breil-sur-Mérize
Brette-les-Pins
Briosne-lès-Sables
La Bruère-sur-Loir
Brûlon
Cérans-Foulletourte
Chahaignes
Challes
Champagné
Champfleur
Champrond
Changé
Chantenay-Villedieu
La Chapelle-aux-Choux
La Chapelle-d’Aligné
La Chapelle-du-Bois
La Chapelle-Gaugain
La Chapelle-Huon
La Chapelle-Saint-Aubin
La Chapelle-Saint-Fray
La Chapelle-Saint-Rémy
La Chartre-sur-le-Loir
Chassillé
Château-du
부산오피

Atolls of the Maldives

This article is about the natural geographical atolls of the Maldives. For the administrative units also known as atollls, see Administrative divisions of the Maldives. For individual islands that make up the archipelago, see List of islands of the Maldives.

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (March 2008) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Geographic distribution of the Natural Atolls of the Maldives

Satellite Image of the Maldives by NASA. The southernmost Atoll of the Maldives, Addu Atoll, is not visible on the image.

1814 map of ‘The Maldiva Islands’ by Captain James Horsburgh.

The Maldives are formed by a number of natural atolls plus atolls in the form of a few islands and isolated reefs today which form a pattern stretching from 7 degrees 10′ North to 0 degrees 45′ South.
The Maldives is a long and narrow country formed by 26 natural atolls. Some atolls are in the form of a number of islands by time and in the form of isolated reefs, which could be classified as smaller atoll formations. All land above the surface in the Maldives is of coralline origin. The atolls of the Maldives form a quite regular chain and, especially in the northern and central atolls, an arrayed structure is apparent. There are broad and deep channels in between some atolls.[1] The origin of the word atoll itself is in the language of the Maldives. ‘Atoll’ (from Dhivehi ‘atholhu’) is now used in many languages worldwide.[2]
Traditionally, Maldivians call the atolls ending in ‘-madulu’ or ‘-mathi’ by their name without adding the word ‘Atoll’ at the end. For example, it is correct to write simply Kolhumadulhu, without adding the word ‘Atholhu’ at the end. This is also the case in the atoll known as Faadhippolhu.
The atolls of the Maldives are very complex structures and formerly they were very dangerous for navigators. In 1834-36 British Captain Robert Moresby undertook the laborious and difficult cartography of the Maldive Islands, drawing the first accurate maritime charts of this complicated Indian Ocean atoll group.
These Admiralty charts were printed as three separate large maps by the Hydrographic Service of the Royal Navy. Although they contain a few errors, Moresby’s charts were so good that they were favoured by Maldivian pilots navigating through the treacherous waters of their atol
부산오피